Publication - Value-added soy protein

Titre en anglais
Value-added soy protein
Numéro de publication
11018E
Année de publication
2009
Adresse URL
Auteur(s)
Organisation
Sujet(s)
Type
PDF électronique
Coût
Publication gratuite
Langue
Anglais
Région
Québec
Aussi disponible en :
État
Disponible
Pages
1-2
ISBN
978-1-100-13572-4
Numéro de catalogue
A52-152/2009E
Sommaire en anglais
Consumers are increasingly interested in including proteins from plant sources in their diet, to a large extent because of the beneficial health effects attributed to them. Throughout the world, protein from soy is the most widely consumed plant protein, accounting for 68 percent of total consumption of this type of protein, according to data for 2009. Depending on the type of process used to extract and purify the soy protein, the isolate (90 percent protein content or more) obtained may still contain varying amounts of undesirable compounds, such as trypsin inhibitors and phytic acid. Trypsin is an enzyme that allows protein digestion, and trypsin inhibitors prevent the enzyme from functioning properly. It is fairly easy to eliminate trypsin inhibitors by heating soy flakes or flour before extracting their protein. It is a different story in the case of phytic acid, which binds to the protein and is not destroyed by heat. The presence of phytic acid in the isolate can reduce calcium absorption in the intestines by up to 90 percent and interferes with protein assimilation. In adults with a varied diet, this is not a problem, but the situation can be different for nursing infants, children and adolescents who are still growing, as well as for the elderly, who have higher calcium and protein requirements. That said, most soy protein isolates currently on the market are high in phytic acid.
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